{FD} Studies: Warming made Harvey’s deluge 3 times more likely

New studies find global warming’s fingerprints were all over the record rainfall from Hurricane Harvey this year.

{FD} Harvey’s ‘Biblical’ rainfall is getting more likely

The chances of a hurricane flooding parts of Texas, like Harvey did, have soared sixfold in just 25 years because of global warming and will likely triple once again before the end of the century, a new study says.

{FD} Winds, floods and fire: US ties record for costly weather

Howling winds, deadly floods, fire and ice so far this year have pushed the U.S. into a tie for weather disasters that topped in $1 billion in damages.

{FD} Science Says: Era of monster hurricanes roiling the Atlantic

An analysis of 167 years of federal storm data by The Associated Press finds that the monster hurricanes that raged across the Atlantic this season are contributing to what appears to be the most active period for major storms on record.

{FD} Sea critters hitchhiked across the Pacific on tsunami debris

Nearly 300 species of fish, mussels and other sea critters hitchhiked across the Pacific Ocean on debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami, washing ashore alive in the United States, researchers reported Thursday.

{FD} Soft soil makes Mexico City shake like it was built on jelly

The soft soil that lines the ancient lake bed that Mexico City is built on amplified the shaking from Tuesday’s earthquake and increased its destructive force, seismologists say as they try to better understand the quake that has killed more than 200 people.

{FD} Life and death of Irma: 2 weeks of fury and devastation end

Irma, a record-breaking powerful hurricane that flattened some Caribbean islands and then enveloped nearly all of Florida in its fury, no longer exists.

{FD} Irma’s life and demise: 2 weeks of destruction and fear

Irma, which flattened some Caribbean islands and enveloped nearly all of Florida in its fury, no longer exists.

{FD} Irma lost some oomph over Cuba before its assault on Florida

Before crashing into Florida, Hurricane Irma set all sorts of records for brute strength as it flattened Caribbean islands and swamped the Florida Keys.

{FD} Irma set records, but late weakening dampened some power

Before crashing into Florida, Hurricane Irma set all sorts of records for brute strength, flattening islands in the Caribbean and swamping the Florida Keys.

{FD} Irma is looking more and more Tampa-bound, forecasters say

The National Hurricane Center says it’s looking more likely that the eye of powerful Hurricane Irma will strike the Keys, southwestern Florida and Tampa Bay region.

{FD} Nowhere will be safe: Can scary words save public from Irma?

Catastrophic, life-threatening, extremely dangerous.

{FD} Winds, fire, floods and quakes: A nutty run of nature

With four big hurricanes, a powerful earthquake and wildfires, it seems that nature recently has just gone nuts.

{FD} Andrew was a monster; Irma could blow it out of the water

For an entire generation in South Florida, Hurricane Andrew was the monster storm that reshaped a region.

{FD} Hurricane Irma likely to be far worse than monster Andrew

For an entire generation in South Florida, Hurricane Andrew was the monster storm that reshaped a region.

{FD} Why Irma is so strong and other questions about hurricanes

A powerful Hurricane Irma is threatening millions of people in the Caribbean and Florida.

{FD} How forecasters deal with ‘spaghetti’ of hurricane scenarios

Hurricane Irma, with its record strong winds, is lashing the Caribbean but where will it go from there?

Meteorologists gave early warning of Harvey’s killer floods

Although some officials may say that Hurricane Harvey was worse than expected, the National Hurricane Center was warning about catastrophic flooding about 30 hours before the first rain drops fell.

Scientists: Climate change could cause storms like Harvey

By the time the rain stops, Harvey will have dumped about 1 million gallons of water for every man, woman and child in southeastern Texas — a soggy, record-breaking glimpse of the wet and wild future global warming could bring, scientists say.

Scientists say Harvey may be the soggy sign of future storms

Harvey has already dumped 15 trillion gallons of water on southeast Texas, which is about three-quarters of a million gallons for every man, woman and child.